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BRUNTON TURRET

ALTERNATIVE NAME:  TURRET 26B
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The site of Brunton Turret, also known as Turret 26b. It is preserved with upstanding remains up to 2.8 metres high, and forms part of a 69 metre long section of Hadrian's Wall. Within the turret is a free-standing altar. The turret was first excavated by J. Clayton during 1873 and later by T. Hepple in 1930. It has since been consolidated. The turret measures twelve feet nine inches by eleven feet six inches internally, and is recessed about four feet into the wall. It has a doorway nearly four feet wide. The side walls of the turret are two feet nine inches thick. Hadrian's Wall forms the north wall of the turret, which was standing eleven courses high in 1947. Its south wall is nearly four feet high. On the east side of the turret the broad wall wing is joined by a narrow section of wall, indicating that the turrets were built first and the Wall was then built up to them. Near to Brunton Turret a centurial stone was found in situ with the inscription COH IX > PAV.APRI ('The century of Paulus Aper of the ninth cohort').

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Further information about monuments may be obtained by contacting Archive Services, through the English Heritage website.